Wedding Traditions….

Ever wondered why a wedding cake is tiered, or why a bride throws her bouquet?  Here’s the explanations!

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HAVE A TIERED CAKE

Bread or cake has been part of celebration foods since medieval times. Then, it was customary for wedding guests to bring small cakes to the feast to place in front of the bride and groom, who had to try to kiss over the pile to guarantee their future prosperity. But the traditional wedding cake as we now know it (separate uniform cakes stacked on top of each other), originated at the wedding of Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany, in 1882. Placing pillars between each of the tiers began to appear around 20 years later – they were originally made from chopped broomsticks covered in icing. Incidentally, when Queen Victoria used white icing on her 1840 wedding cake it gained a whole new title – royal icing.

STAND TO THE LEFT OF THE GROOM

Much of the traditional wedding ceremony is based on ancient Roman customs, when marriages were arranged. So this tradition symbolises the act of your FBride with her fatherather (quite literally) handing you over to a new owner. Usually, the bride was given away in exchange for a price or dowry.

 

 

THROW CONFETTI

Confetti is an Italian word used for a type of sugared almond tossed into the air during special occasions. In Britain, throwing grains of rice at newlyweds goes back to pagan weddings, when it was seen as a symbol of fertility. It was the Victorians – perhaps sick of picking food out of their hair – who first used shredded paper.

 

WEAR THE RING ON THE THIRD FINGER OF THE LEFT HAND images (2)

In the days before anyone understood the body’s circulatory system, the ancient Greeks believed that there was a vein that connected this finger directly to the heart. Technically, all veins lead to the heart, but it’s a lovely thought nonetheless.

 

 

SOMETHING OLD, SOMETHING NEW, SOMETHING BORROWED, SOMETHING BLUE AND A SILVER SIXPENCE IN YOUR SHOE

Something old

This represents the bride’s links with her past – more specifically, to the bride’s life with her family.

Something new

If the ‘old’ is the past, the ‘new’, of course, is the future – something fresh to start your new life with.

Something borrowed

If you borrow something you have to return it, and this line is to remind the bride that her family will always be around for her.

Something blue

Back in Biblical times, the colour blue meant purity, so wearing something blue at your wedding, as well as white, gives you two chances to show how innocent you are

Silver sixpence in your shoe

This is the line everyone forgets (well, walking with money in your shoe is uncomfortable), but it symbolises future wealth.

 

THROW THE BOUQUETDSC_0486

This stems from a French 14th-century tradition. In medieval times, guests would rip the bride’s dress to shreds – having a piece of the dress was considered lucky, so after the ceremony, the congregation would pounce and tear it. This morphed into having the groom throw the bride’s garter into the crowd to keep the luck-hunters at bay, before the bouquet emerged as a more civilised alternative to the garter. And it also acted as a deterrent to anyone planning to prise the garter off a bride’s leg.